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Loumain Construction Australia Blog047

Understanding which segments of the environment are vulnerable is a prereguisite to identifying and managing environmental risks.
The assessment should not only consider the environmental impacts on a site, but whether or not off-site effects are possible.

Loumain Construction Australia Environment006

Overview of how Environmentally Sustainable Design and Construction (ESDC) Principles and Guidelines can be integrated as part of environmental sustainability into the construction processes for all new building construction works.

When is a Works Approval proces required and how EPA assesses applications?

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) - Australia's national environment law - makes it an offence for any person to take an action that is likely to have a significant impact on matters protected by the Act, unless they have the approval of the Australian environment minister. Protected matters are matters of national environmental significance as well as the environment of Commonwealth land.

The eight matters of national environmental significance protected by the EPBC Act are:

  1. world heritage properties

  2. national heritage places

  3. wetlands of international importance (listed under the Ramsar Convention)

  4. migratory species protected under international agreements

  5. listed threatened species and ecological communities

  6. Commonwealth marine areas

  7. the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, and

  8. nuclear actions (including uranium mines).

The EPBC Act also applies to actions that have an impact on the environment on Commonwealth land, and to actions taken by the Australian Government, and Australian Government agencies which are likely to have a significant impact on the environment (anywhere).

How does the EPBC Act work?

The EPBC Act requires anyone who may be planning to take an action that is likely to have a significant impact on a matter protected by the Act to refer their project to the Australian environment minister to determine whether or not approval is required. If an approval under the EPBC Act is needed, it can only be given after the impacts of the project have been assessed through a rigorous and transparent process run by the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, or a state, territory or other Australian Government process accredited by the Australian environment minister.

Local government is a key player in protecting Australia's environment, and the EPBC Act does have implications for the operations, responsibilities, employees and contractors of local governments.

EPBC Act apply to actions by Local Governments

Local government activities may require approval if there is a likely significant impact on a matter protected by the EPBC Act. This means activities that involve, for example, clearing native vegetation, changing the natural flow of water, or controlling weeds and other pests should be referred to the Australian environment minister if they are likely to have a significant impact on a matter protected under the EPBC Act (see above). The EPBC Act Significant impact guidelines 1.1 provide information on several local government activities and their potential to have a significant impact on nationally protected matters. Once a referral is made, the environment minister makes a decision within 20 business days (four weeks) on whether approval is needed.

The EPBC Act also applies to actions by state, territory and Australian Government agencies.

The first step in working out how the EPBC Act affects a particular area or project is to locate matters protected by the EPBC Act in the immediate area. The department maintains an extensive database of matters of national environmental significance, such as lists of nationally threatened species, available at www.environment.gov.au/epbc/assessments.

A searchable mapping tool is also available at www.environment.gov.au/erin/ert/epbc, which allows anyone to determine which matters of national environmental significance may be affected by development in a particular area. Once you know what may be affected, it is a matter of determining whether a significant impact is likely. Information about habitat issues and threats affecting each protected area or species is also available at the department's website at www.environment.gov.au/epbc. State agencies and local government environment officers will also have more detailed information to help determine the level of risk, and whether it is advisable to make a referral.

Projects in a local government area may need the approval of the Australian environment minister in addition to local and state approvals.

Developments that comply with local and state requirements may still need to be separately approved by the Australian environment minister. Failure to gain the minister's approval can leave developers open to unnecessary delays, and even prosecution, if matters protected by the EPBC Act are significantly affected.

Local government officials can advise applicants of the need to address the requirements of the EPBC Act in situations where a development proposal may have an impact on a nationally protected matter or the environment of Commonwealth land.

Councils are not responsible for making a referral to the environment minister on behalf of applicants, and the council's own approval of a project does not need to be referred under the Act.

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